First Nations, Métis & Inuit

Welcome Jeremy Albert!

A new face has joined the First Nations, Métis and Inuit education team at Elk Island Public Schools (EIPS).

 

With Elder Wilson Bearhead stepping down from his position in June, Jeremy Albert was chosen to take his place. He may be new to EIPS but is no stranger to education, with almost 20 years of experience.

 

While he continues to build on the foundation Elder Wilson has laid out, he also brings his own perspectives to the conversation as well.

 

“The work we do is all about the young people,” said Albert. “We want to prepare the next generation for the challenges they might face in the future, we want them to be able to take the teachings we share and use them to make the world a better place for everyone.”

 

His goal is to ensure that young, Indigenous students are able to see themselves reflected in the school system, and that non-Indigenous students can gain a more complete perspective of the stories, cultures and histories that make up the other half of the shared treaty relationship.

 

“I’m a Cree language learner myself, and I think it’s important to incorporate each territory’s traditional language into our teachings," Albert explained. "While I’m not from the Elk Island region, I want to work to connect schools with local knowledge-holders, to learn more about our interactions with this land and its animals, plants and medicines.”

First Nations, Métis and Inuit Education-Parent Engagement Series

 

The First Nations, Métis and Inuit education team is offering two online parent information and engagement series for EIPS families. 

Series #1: Developing Foundational Knowledge of First Nations, Metis and Inuit cultures, histories and contemporary contexts.

 

This three part series is designed for EIPS parents and families who are curious to learn 

about First Nations, Métis and Inuit cultures, perspectives and histories. These sessions are designed as entry points to understanding as we work toward learning our collective truth on the path of reconciliation.

Sessions will be held online using Microsoft Teams Meetings,  Join on your computer or mobile app. Click here to join the meeting

  • Session 1 (virtual): February 2, 2021 (7 - 7:30 PM)
  • Who we are and why this work is needed 
  • What reconciliation looks like in EIPS
  • Session 2 (virtual) February 23, 2021 (7 - 7:30 PM)

 

      • Addressing common roadblocks to understanding and relationship
      • Terminology; bridging the gap between what language parents may be used to hearing and what children are learning in schools

 

  • Session 3 (virtual)  March 16, 2021 (7 - 7:30 PM)

 

    • Language of this land- The importance of highlighting Indigenous languages; deepening understanding of relationship to land through language; what exploration of Indigenous languages can look like in schools

 

Series #2: Virtual gathering of First Nations, Métis and Inuit parents and families.

This series is designed for First Nations, Métis and Inuit parents and families who are curious to learn more about the supports offered throughout EIPS. It is an opportunity for First Nations, Métis and Inuit parents to gather together and engage in conversation in partnership with the EIPS First Nations, Métis and Inuit education team.

 

Sessions will be held online using Microsoft Teams Meetings,  Join on your computer or mobile app  Click here to join the meeting

 

  • Initial Gathering (virtual):  January 26, 2021 (7 - 7:30 PM)

 

  • Introduction to the First Nations, Métis and Inuit education team
    • What self-identification is and what it means
    • What supports are in place for self-identified students
  • Future sessions will be discussed and decided upon with input from participating parents and families.

Grade 5 Blanket Exercise

In 1996, the Aboriginal Rights Coalition worked with Indigenous elders and teachers to develop an interactive way of learning the Indigenous history most Canadians are never taught. The Blanket Exercise was the result; it has since been offered thousands of times and the fourth edition was released in 2016.

How it works

The Blanket Exercise is based on participatory education methodology and the goal is to build understanding about our shared history as Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Canada by walking through pre-contact, treaty-making, colonization and resistance. Everyone is actively involved as they step onto blankets that represent the land, and into the role of First Nations, Inuit and later Métis peoples.